MuskogeePhoenix.com, Muskogee, OK

September 26, 2013

Craft show patron turns vendor

She’ll bring faux stained glass to Fin and Feather Fall Festival

By Leilani Roberts Ott
Phoenix Correspondent

— Tena Bond of Muskogee has walked through row after row of handmade items over the years at Fin and Feather Fall Festival Arts and Crafts Show near Gore.

Never did she imagine that her faux stained glass art would make its debut at the 45th annual show, which opens today.

“I was told I’d never get in,” Bond said.

Her mother, Joyce Adcock, encouraged her to send in an application and photos in hope that she might be accepted in a couple of years. Surprise! She’s in now.

Bond and her partner, Buster Brown, have a booth, Two Bikers Glass Art, filled with 100 faux stained glass pieces for sale for $25 to $50.

Lezli Pool, the festival’s show coordinator, said it will have about 175 exhibitors from seven states showing their works in three buildings and more than 100 tents on the grounds of Fin and Feather Resort.

They include Jan Jobe of Muskogee, who has exhibited at the show for years.

“I am so excited for the Fin and Feather Show,” Jobe said. “They do such a wonderful job of organizing and managing the show every year.”

This year she’s selling cowboy boot purses, mesh wreaths, Indian corn, and a new item — rag rug totes.

“Yes, they are made from a rug,” Jobe said. “See you there.”

A few other area exhibitors include Norma Hight of Wagoner; Pam Villines and Miriam Sommers, both of Muskogee; and a mother-daughter team, Laurie West of Porter and Olivia Stinnett of Big Cabin.

Hight has handmade beaded jewelry with magnetic closures and beaded scarves. Visit her booth to see her “Christmas spiders.”

Villines is bringing Amish goodies, including baked goods such as cinnamon rolls, pies, cakes and nut bread; fudge; beef jerky; noodles; jams and pickles.

“Our top selling cashew crunch, made by a 90-year-old Amish lady in Inola, will also be available,” Villines said.

This will be Sommers’ fourth or fifth year to be a part of the festival with her sister in their booth, My Sisters Charms. They solder charms to hang on necklaces. The charms are images, initials or quotes sandwiched between glass and soldered together using lead-free sterling silver solder.

“We also love to repurpose old pieces, mobiles from silverware, quotes painted on vintage windows or wood, jewelry holders from old chairs ... we are limited only by our imagination,” Sommers said.

They also are bringing pillows made from vintage sugar sacks, coasters made out of old tiles and candle holders adorned with burlap on old mason jars.

“It is one of my absolute favorites,” Sommers said of the festival. “The customers, staff and fellow merchants are all down-to-earth, friendly people.

“I have been in the same space for the past three years and love my neighbors. You get to be like family and look forward to seeing them every year — Viva with her beautiful iron pieces on one side of us, the sweet smell of soy candles across from us and delicious salsa on the other side.”

Designs by Olivia is also new to Fin and Feather. West said they started their adventure last summer. They love to create things and together have about 62 years of sewing experience. They are obsessed with aprons. At the festival, they’ll have 100 aprons “handmade with love.” Their wares include full aprons, half aprons, and adult and children’s aprons.

The featured apron is a Christmas Santa apron that will be displayed at the show. The two will also have fall/Christmas items as well as items that can be used throughout the year.

Bond and Brown’s faux stained glass art includes images of cats, deer, tigers, bears, leopards, zebras, bulls and horses. They’ll also have art for children, including a cow jumping over the moon and a bright carousel pony that has been a favorite among friends viewing the pieces.

“It’s all one-of-a kind,” Bond said. “There are no duplicates.”

Two Bikers Glass Art started in February when Bond and her daughter, Jennifer Bond, saw a stained glass window of a leopard on a tree branch. She liked it but not its price. So, with the encouragement of her daughter, they bought liquid leading and glass paint. Brown said they use as a base refurbished picture frames, many of which they find at garage sales.

Bond lays the glass over a pattern and begins the painting process, almost like a paint-by-number picture.

“Everybody liked it so much,” she said. “I branched out and did more.”

When Brown saw her work, he said, he thought: “I could do that.”

When the two met, Bond was a barrel racer, team roper and rodeo producer. She also is a nurse in ICU at EASTAR Health System. Brown introduced her to motorcycles. Bond has a Kawasaki Drifter and Brown has a Harley-Davidson.

“We said when we got together, we would do things together and we have,” Brown said.

When not creating art or riding motorcycles, they are involved with Oldham Memorial Baptist Church. Many of their church friends have been encouraging them to do their glass art. Bond’s mother, Adcock, who is also a member of the church, has a calico cat they painted on her dining room window. It’s her favorite.

“I think it’s gorgeous, and it’s not for sale,” Adcock said and smiled.

Another favorite is a bucking bull made in honor of Adcock’s husband and Bond’s father, the late Wayne Adcock, who raised American Brahman bulls and was a rodeo announcer.

Bond has had requests such as making a deputy’s badge and putting dog names on glass jars that hold dog food.

Painting is a stress reliever, she said. With the extra money from their art, Bond and Brown took a motorcycle ride from Natchez, Miss., to Nashville, Tenn. If their art sells well at Fin and Feather, they’ll take a cruise to the Bahamas in December.

If you go

WHAT: 45th annual Fin and Feather Fall Festival Arts and Crafts Show.

WHEN: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

WHERE: Fin and Feather Resort near Gore on Lake Tenkiller.

COST: Admission and parking are free.

INFORMATION: www.finandfeatherresort.com or (918) 487-5148.