MuskogeePhoenix.com, Muskogee, OK

Local News

January 11, 2014

Pork producers call for more humane treatment

TULSA (AP) — The yearslong call by animal rights groups to improve conditions on American hog farms advanced considerably this week when two of the country’s biggest meat companies urged producers to change how pregnant sows are housed, and one announced it wanted to stop the practice of killing sick or injured animals by “manual blunt force.”

Tyson Foods sent new animal welfare guidelines to its 3,000 independent hog suppliers on Wednesday — roughly six weeks after gruesome video from an Oklahoma farm showed some animals being struck with bowling balls and others being slammed onto a concrete floor. And Smithfield Foods announced Tuesday it would ask growers to move pregnant sows from gestation crates to group housing by 2022.

The change in corporate policy comes after decades of lobbying and protests from animal rights groups and a trend that saw more food retailers and restaurant chains moving away from suppliers who implemented the controversial hog-raising practices on farms.

The planned overhaul was lauded by several animal rights groups, some who had campaigned against gestation crates, which they deemed institutionalized animal abuse and considered it an outdated and unnecessary practice. “Gestation crates” are cramped, often-foul stalls that barely allow a sow to take a step forward or backward and have been used for decades.

Tyson said it is urging pork producers to improve housing conditions for gestating sows enough to allow sows of all sizes to stand, turn around, lie down and stretch their legs.

Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson said the Arkansas-based company hasn’t taken a position against any particular type of housing, but wants producers to “improve housing systems for pregnant sows by focusing on both the quality and quantity of space provided, whether it involves gestation stalls, pens or some other type of housing.”

“We’re encouraging farmers to consider making these space improvements when they or the piglet suppliers redesign or build new gestation barns,” Mickelson told The Associated Press in an email.

Smithfield, the world’s largest pork producer, had previously said it was phasing out gestation crates at its U.S. facilities by 2017.

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