MuskogeePhoenix.com, Muskogee, OK

Local News

October 31, 2013

A.M. UPDATE: Cherokee Nation museums have free admission in November

Throughout the month of November, all three Cherokee Nation museums are offering free museum admission in celebration of Native American Heritage Month.

Cherokee Nation museums include the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum, the Cherokee National Prison Museum and the John Ross Museum.

In 1990, President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November 1990 "National American Indian Heritage Month." Similar proclamations, under variants on the name (including "Native American Heritage Month" and "National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month") have been issued each year since 1994.

“As we celebrate Native American Heritage this month, it is fitting that we share our Cherokee history and heritage,” said Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “The Cherokee Nation’s story is told in our museums. I encourage you to take advantage of the free admission next month to visit all three of our museums and learn more about our culture and our people.”

Originally built in 1844, the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum is Oklahoma’s oldest public building. The 1,950-square-foot museum features exhibits in three historic aspects: the Cherokee National Judicial System, the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers, and the Cherokee language, with a variety of historical items, including photos, stories, objects and furniture.

The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced and accused prisoners from throughout the territory. Built of sandstone rock, the prison was made to hold the most hardened and dangerous prisoners. The interpretive site and museum show visitors how law and order operated in Indian Territory. The historic site features a working blacksmith area and reconstructed gallows. Today’s museum offers an interactive kiosk to learn stories of notorious Cherokees and how they were perceived as outlaws in the Cherokee Nation, while others were revered as patriots.

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