MuskogeePhoenix.com, Muskogee, OK

January 3, 2014

Museum to feature Charles Banks Wilson portraits


— OKLAHOMA CITY (AP)  —  Charles Banks Wilson was just a boy when he saw Will Rogers for the first time, but the encounter led to a lifelong fascination for the artist who created a variety of portraits of the American humorist.

That experience at the historic Coleman Theatre in Miami, Okla., in February 1931 led to Wilson’s first sketch of Rogers. The sketch later became the basis for a portrait Wilson completed that is on permanent display at Smithsonian’s Institution’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Wilson continued to create portraits of Rogers, until his death last May in Rogers, Ark., at age 94. Several of Wilson’s portraits of Oklahoma’s favorite son will be on display at a permanent exhibit set to open by next month at the Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore, Okla. An exact date for the opening has not been set.

“Charles Banks Wilson was always a big fan of Will Rogers. One of his favorite topics for his art was Native Americans, and he always kind of described himself as a storyteller,” said Jacob Krumwiede, business manager at the Will Rogers Memorial Museum. “Of course, with Will Rogers being kind of a Cherokee folk hero ... he was very proud of his Cherokee roots during a time when it was not widely accepted and there was still a lot of bigotry in the country.”

While attending the Art Institute of Chicago in the 1930s, Wilson sketched faces of more than 100 people from 65 Native American tribes.