MuskogeePhoenix.com, Muskogee, OK

Oklahoma News

December 1, 2013

Penalties costly for wildlife law offenders

TULSA (AP) — Those caught violating Oklahoma wildlife laws and regulations can find themselves owing large amounts of money.

The Tulsa World reported Saturday that a yearlong study found nearly 250 wildlife cases filed in Tulsa, Rogers, Wagoner, Washington, Pawnee, Osage, Okmulgee and Creek county district courts between Nov. 1, 2012, and Oct. 31.

The study does not include charges of fishing or hunting without licenses. People caught fishing or hunting without a license can also purchase a temporary 30-day license while in the field for $50.

Carlos Gomez, a Tulsa County game warden, said he only writes citations for the most egregious cases and handles other incidents with warnings, selling temporary licenses and administrative fines.

Fishing without a license, a $221 fine if convicted, is the most common citation issued across Oklahoma and is the easiest violation to discover, Gomez said. With or without a license, fishermen are confined to the water as opposed to people who may be hunting without a license somewhere back in the woods.

The greatest number of cases, 67, were filed in Osage County District Court, more than one-fourth of the total cases in the eight-counties. Osage is the state’s largest county, with many rural areas, so there is more opportunity for people to commit violations, said Paul Welch, one of four game wardens who patrol the area.

“Headlighting,” also called “spotlighting,” is the most dangerous violation he sees, Welch said in reference to the practice of hunters using vehicle headlights to spot deer and shooting out of the vehicles’ windows.

“They’re shooting in the dark,” Welch said. “They don’t know where they’re shooting or what they’re shooting at.”

1
Text Only
Oklahoma News
AP Video
Kerry: Humanitarian Cease-fire Efforts Continue Raw: Corruption Trial Begins for Former Va Gov. The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming UN Security Council Calls for Gaza Cease-fire Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating 13 Struck by Lightning on Calif. Beach Baseball Hall of Famers Inducted Israel, Hamas Trade Fire Despite Truce in Gaza Italy's Nibali Set to Win First Tour De France Raw: Shipwrecked Concordia Completes Last Voyage Raw: Sea Turtle Hatchlings Emerge From Nest Raw: Massive Dust Storm Covers Phoenix 12-hour Cease-fire in Gaza Fighting Begins Raw: Bolivian Dancers Attempt to Break Record Raw: Israel, Palestine Supporters Rally in US Raw: Air Algerie Flight 5017 Wreckage Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath Judge Faces Heat Over Offer to Help Migrant Kids Kangaroo Goes Missing in Oklahoma More M17 Bodies Return, Sanctions on Russia Grow
Poll

Should a federal judge have the power to strike down Oklahoma's ban on gay marriage?

Yes
No
     View Results
Featured Ads
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
Stocks