In chess, interference occurs when a piece sacrificially steps in-between two opposing pieces on the same file or column in order to achieve a tactical advantage. With this hint in mind, please try to find black’s move.

Black has two pawns on the verge of promotion and white has one. If black has enough time to promote both pawns or break up white’s coordinated a5 and b7 pawns, black wins. Thus, time is of the essence.

To that end, black sacrifices its rook with rook to b6, threatening white’s b7 pawn while under of the thumb of white’s a5 pawn. After white captures the rook, black’s g2 pawn promotes to a queen. White then queens its b7 pawn (see next diagram).

From here, black’s queen checks from f2 and then d2, forcing the white king to e4. Now black pushes its e6 pawn to e7. This allows white to check black, as the queen checks from g3, e5 and b5 before white runs out of checks and is lost (see next diagram).

The lesson this week is that sometimes it’s good to butt in. Remember this the next time you interfere.

Reach Eric Morrow at ericmorrowlaw@gmail.com or (505) 327-7121.

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