When Braggs residents found themselves isolated from the rest of the world, Fort Gibson residents sprang into action. 

People began finding ways to get supplies to Braggs, and Fort Gibson residents established a shelter and began collecting donations to help people affected by the near-record flooding. 

Not only were Braggs residents stranded, they had no power for several days. Bit by bit, things began looking up.

Now that Braggs residents have a way to come and go, some are choosing to help Fort Gibson residents whose homes were flooded. 

It's going to take a lot of time, sweat, energy and back-breaking work to clean up homes that are able to be salvaged. Many of those homes are filled with mud. Workers are being told to get tetanus shots before working in the muddy water. 

Although some people were able to get most of their belongings out, many people lost everything. We don't know how many of those people had flood insurance, but they'll never be able to fully recover from the devastation they are working through.

But, with the help of people from Braggs and many other towns and cities around the state, recovery will happen. It's going to take some time. It won't happen overnight. Yes, the government says they will help, but all of the red tape that comes with disasters will lengthen the recovery time. Patience should be the word of the day.

Cleanup kits and supplies arrived in Fort Gibson from the Red Cross. Cleanup has begun. It will take time. But it will happen — bit by bit.

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