I think your objections to the anonymity of lottery winners are not valid. We have already been told that taxes have been withheld from the winnings. If so, the IDs of the winners are known to the IRS. If child support is owed, the IRS already knows about it and will seize that money as well as taxes owed.

In any case, the trust’s lawyers have a duty to determine that their client-winners are eligible to play the lottery and have no priority debts like child support that would be affected. They should have made that statement in their filing which claimed the prize, on pain of their own censure (as lawyers or trust officers) for misstatements. The commission probably has that requirement in place, i.e., a sworn statement that the winners were eligible to play the lottery. I doubt that the commission omitted this basic safeguard.

I can think of lots of reasons that a winner would want to remain anonymous, can’t you?

Personally I don’t play lotteries, but if I were to win there would be scam artists and phantom relatives at my doorstep within minutes. It seems to me that the winners went about this very responsibly by going through the steps of setting up a trust to handle this large amount of money.

Kathie Fite

Muskogee


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